DS.RESTAdapter Class packages/ember-data/lib/adapters/rest_adapter.js:15

The REST adapter allows your store to communicate with an HTTP server by transmitting JSON via XHR. Most Ember.js apps that consume a JSON API should use the REST adapter.

This adapter is designed around the idea that the JSON exchanged with the server should be conventional.

JSON Structure

The REST adapter expects the JSON returned from your server to follow these conventions.

Object Root

The JSON payload should be an object that contains the record inside a root property. For example, in response to a GET request for /posts/1, the JSON should look like this:

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{
  "post": {
    "id": 1,
    "title": "I'm Running to Reform the W3C's Tag",
    "author": "Yehuda Katz"
  }
}

Similarly, in response to a GET request for /posts, the JSON should look like this:

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{
  "posts": [
    {
      "id": 1,
      "title": "I'm Running to Reform the W3C's Tag",
      "author": "Yehuda Katz"
    },
    {
      "id": 2,
      "title": "Rails is omakase",
      "author": "D2H"
    }
  ]
}

Conventional Names

Attribute names in your JSON payload should be the camelCased versions of the attributes in your Ember.js models.

For example, if you have a Person model:

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App.Person = DS.Model.extend({
  firstName: DS.attr('string'),
  lastName: DS.attr('string'),
  occupation: DS.attr('string')
});

The JSON returned should look like this:

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{
  "person": {
    "id": 5,
    "firstName": "Barack",
    "lastName": "Obama",
    "occupation": "President"
  }
}

Customization

Endpoint path customization

Endpoint paths can be prefixed with a namespace by setting the namespace property on the adapter:

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DS.RESTAdapter.reopen({
  namespace: 'api/1'
});

Requests for App.Person would now target /api/1/people/1.

Host customization

An adapter can target other hosts by setting the host property.

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DS.RESTAdapter.reopen({
  host: 'https://api.example.com'
});

Headers customization

Some APIs require HTTP headers, e.g. to provide an API key. Arbitrary headers can be set as key/value pairs on the RESTAdapter's headers object and Ember Data will send them along with each ajax request.

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App.ApplicationAdapter = DS.RESTAdapter.extend({
  headers: {
    "API_KEY": "secret key",
    "ANOTHER_HEADER": "Some header value"
  }
});

headers can also be used as a computed property to support dynamic headers. In the example below, the session object has been injected into an adapter by Ember's container.

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App.ApplicationAdapter = DS.RESTAdapter.extend({
  headers: function() {
    return {
      "API_KEY": this.get("session.authToken"),
      "ANOTHER_HEADER": "Some header value"
    };
  }.property("session.authToken")
});

In some cases, your dynamic headers may require data from some object outside of Ember's observer system (for example document.cookie). You can use the volatile function to set the property into a non-cached mode causing the headers to be recomputed with every request.

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App.ApplicationAdapter = DS.RESTAdapter.extend({
  headers: function() {
    return {
      "API_KEY": Ember.get(document.cookie.match(/apiKey\=([^;]*)/), "1"),
      "ANOTHER_HEADER": "Some header value"
    };
  }.property().volatile()
});
Show:

_scheduledDestroy

private

Invoked by the run loop to actually destroy the object. This is scheduled for execution by the destroy method.

addObserver

(key, target, method)

Adds an observer on a property.

This is the core method used to register an observer for a property.

Once you call this method, any time the key's value is set, your observer will be notified. Note that the observers are triggered any time the value is set, regardless of whether it has actually changed. Your observer should be prepared to handle that.

You can also pass an optional context parameter to this method. The context will be passed to your observer method whenever it is triggered. Note that if you add the same target/method pair on a key multiple times with different context parameters, your observer will only be called once with the last context you passed.

Observer Methods

Observer methods you pass should generally have the following signature if you do not pass a context parameter:

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fooDidChange: function(sender, key, value, rev) { };

The sender is the object that changed. The key is the property that changes. The value property is currently reserved and unused. The rev is the last property revision of the object when it changed, which you can use to detect if the key value has really changed or not.

If you pass a context parameter, the context will be passed before the revision like so:

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fooDidChange: function(sender, key, value, context, rev) { };

Usually you will not need the value, context or revision parameters at the end. In this case, it is common to write observer methods that take only a sender and key value as parameters or, if you aren't interested in any of these values, to write an observer that has no parameters at all.

Parameters:

key String
The key to observer
target Object
The target object to invoke
method String|Function
The method to invoke.

ajax

(url, type, hash) Promise private

Takes a URL, an HTTP method and a hash of data, and makes an HTTP request.

When the server responds with a payload, Ember Data will call into extractSingle or extractArray (depending on whether the original query was for one record or many records).

By default, ajax method has the following behavior:

  • It sets the response dataType to "json"
  • If the HTTP method is not "GET", it sets the Content-Type to be application/json; charset=utf-8
  • If the HTTP method is not "GET", it stringifies the data passed in. The data is the serialized record in the case of a save.
  • Registers success and failure handlers.

Parameters:

url String
type String
The request type GET, POST, PUT, DELETE etc.
hash Object

Returns:

Promise
promise

ajaxError

(jqXHR, jsonPayload) Object

Takes an ajax response, and returns the json payload.

By default this hook just returns the jsonPayload passed to it. You might want to override it in two cases:

  1. Your API might return useful results in the request headers. If you need to access these, you can override this hook to copy them from jqXHR to the payload object so they can be processed in you serializer.

  2. Your API might return errors as successful responses with status code 200 and an Errors text or object. You can return a DS.InvalidError from this hook and it will automatically reject the promise and put your record into the invald state.

Parameters:

jqXHR Object
jsonPayload Object

Returns:

Object
jqXHR

ajaxOptions

(url, type, hash) Object private

Parameters:

url String
type String
The request type GET, POST, PUT, DELETE etc.
hash Object

Returns:

Object
hash

beginPropertyChanges

Ember.Observable

Begins a grouping of property changes.

You can use this method to group property changes so that notifications will not be sent until the changes are finished. If you plan to make a large number of changes to an object at one time, you should call this method at the beginning of the changes to begin deferring change notifications. When you are done making changes, call endPropertyChanges() to deliver the deferred change notifications and end deferring.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

buildURL

(type, id, record) String

Builds a URL for a given type and optional ID.

By default, it pluralizes the type's name (for example, 'post' becomes 'posts' and 'person' becomes 'people'). To override the pluralization see pathForType.

If an ID is specified, it adds the ID to the path generated for the type, separated by a /.

Parameters:

type String
id String
record DS.Model

Returns:

String
url

cacheFor

(keyName) Object

Returns the cached value of a computed property, if it exists. This allows you to inspect the value of a computed property without accidentally invoking it if it is intended to be generated lazily.

Parameters:

keyName String

Returns:

Object
The cached value of the computed property, if any

create

(arguments) static

Creates an instance of a class. Accepts either no arguments, or an object containing values to initialize the newly instantiated object with.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  helloWorld: function() {
    alert("Hi, my name is " + this.get('name'));
  }
});

var tom = App.Person.create({
  name: 'Tom Dale'
});

tom.helloWorld(); // alerts "Hi, my name is Tom Dale".

create will call the init function if defined during Ember.AnyObject.extend

If no arguments are passed to create, it will not set values to the new instance during initialization:

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var noName = App.Person.create();
noName.helloWorld(); // alerts undefined

NOTE: For performance reasons, you cannot declare methods or computed properties during create. You should instead declare methods and computed properties when using extend or use the createWithMixins shorthand.

Parameters:

arguments

createRecord

(store, type, record) Promise

Called by the store when a newly created record is saved via the save method on a model record instance.

The createRecord method serializes the record and makes an Ajax (HTTP POST) request to a URL computed by buildURL.

See serialize for information on how to customize the serialized form of a record.

Parameters:

store DS.Store
type subclass of DS.Model
record DS.Model

Returns:

Promise
promise

createWithMixins

(arguments) static

Equivalent to doing extend(arguments).create(). If possible use the normal create method instead.

Parameters:

arguments

decrementProperty

(keyName, decrement) Number

Set the value of a property to the current value minus some amount.

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player.decrementProperty('lives');
orc.decrementProperty('health', 5);

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to decrement
decrement Number
The amount to decrement by. Defaults to 1

Returns:

Number
The new property value

deleteRecord

(store, type, record) Promise

Called by the store when a record is deleted.

The deleteRecord method makes an Ajax (HTTP DELETE) request to a URL computed by buildURL.

Parameters:

store DS.Store
type subclass of DS.Model
record DS.Model

Returns:

Promise
promise

destroy

Ember.Object

Destroys an object by setting the isDestroyed flag and removing its metadata, which effectively destroys observers and bindings.

If you try to set a property on a destroyed object, an exception will be raised.

Note that destruction is scheduled for the end of the run loop and does not happen immediately. It will set an isDestroying flag immediately.

Returns:

Ember.Object
receiver

eachComputedProperty

(callback, binding)

Iterate over each computed property for the class, passing its name and any associated metadata (see metaForProperty) to the callback.

Parameters:

callback Function
binding Object

endPropertyChanges

Ember.Observable

Ends a grouping of property changes.

You can use this method to group property changes so that notifications will not be sent until the changes are finished. If you plan to make a large number of changes to an object at one time, you should call beginPropertyChanges() at the beginning of the changes to defer change notifications. When you are done making changes, call this method to deliver the deferred change notifications and end deferring.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

extend

(mixins, arguments) static

Creates a new subclass.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    alert(thing);
   }
});

This defines a new subclass of Ember.Object: App.Person. It contains one method: say().

You can also create a subclass from any existing class by calling its extend() method. For example, you might want to create a subclass of Ember's built-in Ember.View class:

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App.PersonView = Ember.View.extend({
  tagName: 'li',
  classNameBindings: ['isAdministrator']
});

When defining a subclass, you can override methods but still access the implementation of your parent class by calling the special _super() method:

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    var name = this.get('name');
    alert(name + ' says: ' + thing);
  }
});

App.Soldier = App.Person.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    this._super(thing + ", sir!");
  },
  march: function(numberOfHours) {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' marches for ' + numberOfHours + ' hours.')
  }
});

var yehuda = App.Soldier.create({
  name: "Yehuda Katz"
});

yehuda.say("Yes");  // alerts "Yehuda Katz says: Yes, sir!"

The create() on line #17 creates an instance of the App.Soldier class. The extend() on line #8 creates a subclass of App.Person. Any instance of the App.Person class will not have the march() method.

You can also pass Mixin classes to add additional properties to the subclass.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' says: ' + thing);
  }
});

App.SingingMixin = Mixin.create({
  sing: function(thing){
    alert(this.get('name') + ' sings: la la la ' + thing);
  }
});

App.BroadwayStar = App.Person.extend(App.SingingMixin, {
  dance: function() {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' dances: tap tap tap tap ');
  }
});

The App.BroadwayStar class contains three methods: say(), sing(), and dance().

Parameters:

mixins Mixin
One or more Mixin classes
arguments Object
Object containing values to use within the new class

find

(store, type, id, record) Promise

Called by the store in order to fetch the JSON for a given type and ID.

The find method makes an Ajax request to a URL computed by buildURL, and returns a promise for the resulting payload.

This method performs an HTTP GET request with the id provided as part of the query string.

Parameters:

store DS.Store
type subclass of DS.Model
id String
record DS.Model

Returns:

Promise
promise

findAll

(store, type, sinceToken) Promise private

Called by the store in order to fetch a JSON array for all of the records for a given type.

The findAll method makes an Ajax (HTTP GET) request to a URL computed by buildURL, and returns a promise for the resulting payload.

Parameters:

store DS.Store
type subclass of DS.Model
sinceToken String

Returns:

Promise
promise

findBelongsTo

(store, record, url) Promise

Called by the store in order to fetch a JSON array for the unloaded records in a belongs-to relationship that were originally specified as a URL (inside of links).

For example, if your original payload looks like this:

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{
  "person": {
    "id": 1,
    "name": "Tom Dale",
    "links": { "group": "/people/1/group" }
  }
}

This method will be called with the parent record and /people/1/group.

The findBelongsTo method will make an Ajax (HTTP GET) request to the originally specified URL.

Parameters:

store DS.Store
record DS.Model
url String

Returns:

Promise
promise

findHasMany

(store, record, url) Promise

Called by the store in order to fetch a JSON array for the unloaded records in a has-many relationship that were originally specified as a URL (inside of links).

For example, if your original payload looks like this:

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{
  "post": {
    "id": 1,
    "title": "Rails is omakase",
    "links": { "comments": "/posts/1/comments" }
  }
}

This method will be called with the parent record and /posts/1/comments.

The findHasMany method will make an Ajax (HTTP GET) request to the originally specified URL. If the URL is host-relative (starting with a single slash), the request will use the host specified on the adapter (if any).

Parameters:

store DS.Store
record DS.Model
url String

Returns:

Promise
promise

findMany

(store, type, ids, records) Promise

Called by the store in order to fetch several records together if coalesceFindRequests is true

For example, if the original payload looks like:

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{
  "id": 1,
  "title": "Rails is omakase",
  "comments": [ 1, 2, 3 ]
}

The IDs will be passed as a URL-encoded Array of IDs, in this form:

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ids[]=1&ids[]=2&ids[]=3

Many servers, such as Rails and PHP, will automatically convert this URL-encoded array into an Array for you on the server-side. If you want to encode the IDs, differently, just override this (one-line) method.

The findMany method makes an Ajax (HTTP GET) request to a URL computed by buildURL, and returns a promise for the resulting payload.

Parameters:

store DS.Store
type subclass of DS.Model
ids Array
records Array

Returns:

Promise
promise

findQuery

(store, type, query) Promise private

Called by the store in order to fetch a JSON array for the records that match a particular query.

The findQuery method makes an Ajax (HTTP GET) request to a URL computed by buildURL, and returns a promise for the resulting payload.

The query argument is a simple JavaScript object that will be passed directly to the server as parameters.

Parameters:

store DS.Store
type subclass of DS.Model
query Object

Returns:

Promise
promise

generateIdForRecord

(store, record) String|Number

If the globally unique IDs for your records should be generated on the client, implement the generateIdForRecord() method. This method will be invoked each time you create a new record, and the value returned from it will be assigned to the record's primaryKey.

Most traditional REST-like HTTP APIs will not use this method. Instead, the ID of the record will be set by the server, and your adapter will update the store with the new ID when it calls didCreateRecord(). Only implement this method if you intend to generate record IDs on the client-side.

The generateIdForRecord() method will be invoked with the requesting store as the first parameter and the newly created record as the second parameter:

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generateIdForRecord: function(store, record) {
  var uuid = App.generateUUIDWithStatisticallyLowOddsOfCollision();
  return uuid;
}

Parameters:

store DS.Store
record DS.Model

Returns:

String|Number
id

get

(keyName) Object

Retrieves the value of a property from the object.

This method is usually similar to using object[keyName] or object.keyName, however it supports both computed properties and the unknownProperty handler.

Because get unifies the syntax for accessing all these kinds of properties, it can make many refactorings easier, such as replacing a simple property with a computed property, or vice versa.

Computed Properties

Computed properties are methods defined with the property modifier declared at the end, such as:

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fullName: function() {
  return this.get('firstName') + ' ' + this.get('lastName');
}.property('firstName', 'lastName')

When you call get on a computed property, the function will be called and the return value will be returned instead of the function itself.

Unknown Properties

Likewise, if you try to call get on a property whose value is undefined, the unknownProperty() method will be called on the object. If this method returns any value other than undefined, it will be returned instead. This allows you to implement "virtual" properties that are not defined upfront.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property to retrieve

Returns:

Object
The property value or undefined.

getProperties

(list) Hash

To get the values of multiple properties at once, call getProperties with a list of strings or an array:

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record.getProperties('firstName', 'lastName', 'zipCode');
// { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe', zipCode: '10011' }

is equivalent to:

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record.getProperties(['firstName', 'lastName', 'zipCode']);
// { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe', zipCode: '10011' }

Parameters:

list String...|Array
of keys to get

Returns:

Hash

getWithDefault

(keyName, defaultValue) Object

Retrieves the value of a property, or a default value in the case that the property returns undefined.

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person.getWithDefault('lastName', 'Doe');

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to retrieve
defaultValue Object
The value to return if the property value is undefined

Returns:

Object
The property value or the defaultValue.

groupRecordsForFindMany

(records) Array

Organize records into groups, each of which is to be passed to separate calls to findMany.

This implementation groups together records that have the same base URL but differing ids. For example /comments/1 and /comments/2 will be grouped together because we know findMany can coalesce them together as /comments?ids[]=1&ids[]=2

It also supports urls where ids are passed as a query param, such as /comments?id=1 but not those where there is more than 1 query param such as /comments?id=2&name=David Currently only the query param of id is supported. If you need to support others, please override this or the _stripIDFromURL method.

It does not group records that have differing base urls, such as for example: /posts/1/comments/2 and /posts/2/comments/3

Parameters:

records Array

Returns:

Array
an array of arrays of records, each of which is to be loaded separately by `findMany`.

hasObserverFor

(key) Boolean

Returns true if the object currently has observers registered for a particular key. You can use this method to potentially defer performing an expensive action until someone begins observing a particular property on the object.

Parameters:

key String
Key to check

Returns:

Boolean

incrementProperty

(keyName, increment) Number

Set the value of a property to the current value plus some amount.

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person.incrementProperty('age');
team.incrementProperty('score', 2);

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to increment
increment Number
The amount to increment by. Defaults to 1

Returns:

Number
The new property value

init

An overridable method called when objects are instantiated. By default, does nothing unless it is overridden during class definition.

Example:

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  init: function() {
    alert('Name is ' + this.get('name'));
  }
});

var steve = App.Person.create({
  name: "Steve"
});

// alerts 'Name is Steve'.

NOTE: If you do override init for a framework class like Ember.View or Ember.ArrayController, be sure to call this._super() in your init declaration! If you don't, Ember may not have an opportunity to do important setup work, and you'll see strange behavior in your application.

metaForProperty

(key)

In some cases, you may want to annotate computed properties with additional metadata about how they function or what values they operate on. For example, computed property functions may close over variables that are then no longer available for introspection.

You can pass a hash of these values to a computed property like this:

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person: function() {
  var personId = this.get('personId');
  return App.Person.create({ id: personId });
}.property().meta({ type: App.Person })

Once you've done this, you can retrieve the values saved to the computed property from your class like this:

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MyClass.metaForProperty('person');

This will return the original hash that was passed to meta().

Parameters:

key String
property name

notifyPropertyChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Convenience method to call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange in succession.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key to be notified about.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

pathForType

(type) String

Determines the pathname for a given type.

By default, it pluralizes the type's name (for example, 'post' becomes 'posts' and 'person' becomes 'people').

Pathname customization

For example if you have an object LineItem with an endpoint of "/line_items/".

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App.ApplicationAdapter = DS.RESTAdapter.extend({
  pathForType: function(type) {
    var decamelized = Ember.String.decamelize(type);
    return Ember.String.pluralize(decamelized);
  }
});

Parameters:

type String

Returns:

String
path

propertyDidChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Notify the observer system that a property has just changed.

Sometimes you need to change a value directly or indirectly without actually calling get() or set() on it. In this case, you can use this method and propertyWillChange() instead. Calling these two methods together will notify all observers that the property has potentially changed value.

Note that you must always call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange as a pair. If you do not, it may get the property change groups out of order and cause notifications to be delivered more often than you would like.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key that has just changed.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

propertyWillChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Notify the observer system that a property is about to change.

Sometimes you need to change a value directly or indirectly without actually calling get() or set() on it. In this case, you can use this method and propertyDidChange() instead. Calling these two methods together will notify all observers that the property has potentially changed value.

Note that you must always call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange as a pair. If you do not, it may get the property change groups out of order and cause notifications to be delivered more often than you would like.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key that is about to change.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

removeObserver

(key, target, method)

Remove an observer you have previously registered on this object. Pass the same key, target, and method you passed to addObserver() and your target will no longer receive notifications.

Parameters:

key String
The key to observer
target Object
The target object to invoke
method String|Function
The method to invoke.

reopen

Augments a constructor's prototype with additional properties and functions:

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MyObject = Ember.Object.extend({
  name: 'an object'
});

o = MyObject.create();
o.get('name'); // 'an object'

MyObject.reopen({
  say: function(msg){
    console.log(msg);
  }
})

o2 = MyObject.create();
o2.say("hello"); // logs "hello"

o.say("goodbye"); // logs "goodbye"

To add functions and properties to the constructor itself, see reopenClass

reopenClass

Augments a constructor's own properties and functions:

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MyObject = Ember.Object.extend({
  name: 'an object'
});

MyObject.reopenClass({
  canBuild: false
});

MyObject.canBuild; // false
o = MyObject.create();

In other words, this creates static properties and functions for the class. These are only available on the class and not on any instance of that class.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  name : "",
  sayHello : function(){
    alert("Hello. My name is " + this.get('name'));
  }
});

App.Person.reopenClass({
  species : "Homo sapiens",
  createPerson: function(newPersonsName){
    return App.Person.create({
      name:newPersonsName
    });
  }
});

var tom = App.Person.create({
  name : "Tom Dale"
});
var yehuda = App.Person.createPerson("Yehuda Katz");

tom.sayHello(); // "Hello. My name is Tom Dale"
yehuda.sayHello(); // "Hello. My name is Yehuda Katz"
alert(App.Person.species); // "Homo sapiens"

Note that species and createPerson are not valid on the tom and yehuda variables. They are only valid on App.Person.

To add functions and properties to instances of a constructor by extending the constructor's prototype see reopen

serialize

(record, options) Object

Proxies to the serializer's serialize method.

Example

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App.ApplicationAdapter = DS.Adapter.extend({
  createRecord: function(store, type, record) {
    var data = this.serialize(record, { includeId: true });
    var url = type;

    // ...
  }
});

Parameters:

record DS.Model
options Object

Returns:

Object
serialized record

set

(keyName, value) Ember.Observable

Sets the provided key or path to the value.

This method is generally very similar to calling object[key] = value or object.key = value, except that it provides support for computed properties, the setUnknownProperty() method and property observers.

Computed Properties

If you try to set a value on a key that has a computed property handler defined (see the get() method for an example), then set() will call that method, passing both the value and key instead of simply changing the value itself. This is useful for those times when you need to implement a property that is composed of one or more member properties.

Unknown Properties

If you try to set a value on a key that is undefined in the target object, then the setUnknownProperty() handler will be called instead. This gives you an opportunity to implement complex "virtual" properties that are not predefined on the object. If setUnknownProperty() returns undefined, then set() will simply set the value on the object.

Property Observers

In addition to changing the property, set() will also register a property change with the object. Unless you have placed this call inside of a beginPropertyChanges() and endPropertyChanges(), any "local" observers (i.e. observer methods declared on the same object), will be called immediately. Any "remote" observers (i.e. observer methods declared on another object) will be placed in a queue and called at a later time in a coalesced manner.

Chaining

In addition to property changes, set() returns the value of the object itself so you can do chaining like this:

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record.set('firstName', 'Charles').set('lastName', 'Jolley');

Parameters:

keyName String
The property to set
value Object
The value to set or `null`.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

setProperties

(hash) Ember.Observable

Sets a list of properties at once. These properties are set inside a single beginPropertyChanges and endPropertyChanges batch, so observers will be buffered.

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record.setProperties({ firstName: 'Charles', lastName: 'Jolley' });

Parameters:

hash Hash
the hash of keys and values to set

Returns:

Ember.Observable

toString

String

Returns a string representation which attempts to provide more information than Javascript's toString typically does, in a generic way for all Ember objects.

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App.Person = Em.Object.extend()
person = App.Person.create()
person.toString() //=> "<App.Person:ember1024>"

If the object's class is not defined on an Ember namespace, it will indicate it is a subclass of the registered superclass:

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Student = App.Person.extend()
student = Student.create()
student.toString() //=> "<(subclass of App.Person):ember1025>"

If the method toStringExtension is defined, its return value will be included in the output.

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App.Teacher = App.Person.extend({
  toStringExtension: function() {
    return this.get('fullName');
  }
});
teacher = App.Teacher.create()
teacher.toString(); //=> "<App.Teacher:ember1026:Tom Dale>"

Returns:

String
string representation

toggleProperty

(keyName) Object

Set the value of a boolean property to the opposite of it's current value.

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starship.toggleProperty('warpDriveEngaged');

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to toggle

Returns:

Object
The new property value

updateRecord

(store, type, record) Promise

Called by the store when an existing record is saved via the save method on a model record instance.

The updateRecord method serializes the record and makes an Ajax (HTTP PUT) request to a URL computed by buildURL.

See serialize for information on how to customize the serialized form of a record.

Parameters:

store DS.Store
type subclass of DS.Model
record DS.Model

Returns:

Promise
promise

urlPrefix

(path, parentUrl) String private

Parameters:

path String
parentUrl String

Returns:

String
urlPrefix

willDestroy

Override to implement teardown.

Show:

coalesceFindRequests

{boolean}

By default the RESTAdapter will send each find request coming from a store.find or from accessing a relationship separately to the server. If your server supports passing ids as a query string, you can set coalesceFindRequests to true to coalesce all find requests within a single runloop.

For example, if you have an initial payload of javascript post: { id:1, comments: [1,2] }

By default calling post.get('comments') will trigger the following requests(assuming the comments haven't been loaded before):

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GET /comments/1
GET /comments/2

If you set coalesceFindRequests to true it will instead trigger the following request:

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GET /comments?ids[]=1&ids[]=2

Setting coalesceFindRequests to true also works for store.find requests and belongsTo relationships accessed within the same runloop. If you set coalesceFindRequests: true

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store.find('comment', 1);
store.find('comment', 2);

will also send a request to: GET /comments?ids[]=1&ids[]=2

Note: Requests coalescing rely on URL building strategy. So if you override buildUrl in your app groupRecordsForFindMany more likely should be overriden as well in order for coalescing to work.

concatenatedProperties

Array

Defines the properties that will be concatenated from the superclass (instead of overridden).

By default, when you extend an Ember class a property defined in the subclass overrides a property with the same name that is defined in the superclass. However, there are some cases where it is preferable to build up a property's value by combining the superclass' property value with the subclass' value. An example of this in use within Ember is the classNames property of Ember.View.

Here is some sample code showing the difference between a concatenated property and a normal one:

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App.BarView = Ember.View.extend({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['bar'],
  classNames: ['bar']
});

App.FooBarView = App.BarView.extend({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['foo'],
  classNames: ['foo']
});

var fooBarView = App.FooBarView.create();
fooBarView.get('someNonConcatenatedProperty'); // ['foo']
fooBarView.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo']

This behavior extends to object creation as well. Continuing the above example:

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var view = App.FooBarView.create({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['baz'],
  classNames: ['baz']
})
view.get('someNonConcatenatedProperty'); // ['baz']
view.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo', 'baz']

Adding a single property that is not an array will just add it in the array:

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var view = App.FooBarView.create({
  classNames: 'baz'
})
view.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo', 'baz']

Using the concatenatedProperties property, we can tell to Ember that mix the content of the properties.

In Ember.View the classNameBindings and attributeBindings properties are also concatenated, in addition to classNames.

This feature is available for you to use throughout the Ember object model, although typical app developers are likely to use it infrequently. Since it changes expectations about behavior of properties, you should properly document its usage in each individual concatenated property (to not mislead your users to think they can override the property in a subclass).

Default: null

defaultSerializer

{String}

If you would like your adapter to use a custom serializer you can set the defaultSerializer property to be the name of the custom serializer.

Note the defaultSerializer serializer has a lower priority than a model specific serializer (i.e. PostSerializer) or the application serializer.

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var DjangoAdapter = DS.Adapter.extend({
  defaultSerializer: 'django'
});

headers

{Object}

Some APIs require HTTP headers, e.g. to provide an API key. Arbitrary headers can be set as key/value pairs on the RESTAdapter's headers object and Ember Data will send them along with each ajax request. For dynamic headers see headers customization.

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App.ApplicationAdapter = DS.RESTAdapter.extend({
  headers: {
    "API_KEY": "secret key",
    "ANOTHER_HEADER": "Some header value"
  }
});

host

{String}

An adapter can target other hosts by setting the host property.

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DS.RESTAdapter.reopen({
  host: 'https://api.example.com'
});

Requests for App.Post would now target https://api.example.com/post/.

isDestroyed

Destroyed object property flag.

if this property is true the observers and bindings were already removed by the effect of calling the destroy() method.

Default: false

isDestroying

Destruction scheduled flag. The destroy() method has been called.

The object stays intact until the end of the run loop at which point the isDestroyed flag is set.

Default: false

namespace

{String}

Endpoint paths can be prefixed with a namespace by setting the namespace property on the adapter:

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DS.RESTAdapter.reopen({
  namespace: 'api/1'
});

Requests for App.Post would now target /api/1/post/.